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APHooper
04-01-2009, 06:24 PM
The “Bid System” for the conduct of DBA Campaigns
Version 1.0
By Andy Hooper

This is a simplified campaign system, designed to generate battles that can be resolved using the De Bellus Antiquitatus rule system. Unlike the official campaign rules, this system produces battles that are resolved simultaneously, without the need to wait for one players’ turn to be resolved before others may proceed. In addition, every battle is fought by full twelve-element armies. It was designed with 6 players in mind, but any even number between 4 and 12 would be practical.

Game Materials:
Instead of using a standard campaign map, the Bid system uses the following materials:
►One large piece of paper or cardboard, divided into as many areas as there are players, each identified with the name of the nation they represent.
► A set of eight “bid cards” for each player, with numbered point values as follows: 1 x 4, 2 x 3, 2 x 2, 3 x 1. In addition to their numbered value, each card will have the name of a location or commodity that represents its value to the nation that possesses it. In a broad sense, the cards represent the resources that their corresponding nation is willing or forced to risk in war.
► Three colored tokens or other unique marker for each player to mark his bid cards on the bid board.

Sequence of Play:
Each campaign year consists of two phases: The Bid Phase, and the Battle Phase. In the Bid Phase, players bid for the right to conduct a DBA battle against one of the other players in the campaign. In the Battle Phase, they resolve those battles, subject to all the standard rules of DBA.

The Bid Phase:
During the Bid Phase, players take turns wagering their bid cards in an attempt to control the opponent they must face in the coming battle turn, with the ultimate goal of winning the battle and receiving bid cards of an equal value from their opponent’s hand.

Bid Order Determination:
On the first turn of the game, players roll two dice, and place their bids in descending order corresponding to the rank of their die roll. On the second and subsequent turns, the player with the most cards places first, with ties broken by die roll.

Bidding Procedure:
On their turn, the players place their bid cards on the positions corresponding to the players whose army they wish to face, and whose bid cards they wish to acquire. Each player may make up to three separate bids against three separate potential opponents, subject to the following limitations: A player may make only one bid of any specific number of points per turn: For example, if Early Egypt bids three points worth of cards against the Early Bedouins, they could not bid three points against any other opponent that turn. In addition, the following restrictions apply to the first two campaign years: In the first year, no bid can contain more than two cards. On the second turn, bids are limited to three cards or less. One the third and subsequent turns, bids may be of any number of cards of any value.

When a bid is placed, it should be marked with a distinctive token or marker to identify who placed it; after the first turn, bid cards will be mixed around between the players, and it will no longer be obvious who has placed which cards.

Bid Resolution:
After all players have placed up to three bids on the bid board, all bids are turned face up for resolution. Bids are honored strictly in order of point value; if two more bids offer the same total points, the tie is resolved by die roll. A winning bidder immediately removes their other bids, if any, from the board, as does their chosen opponent. The defending player must select sufficient cards as needed to equal or exceed the winning bidder’s bid. If the defender named in the winning bid has wagered any cards against the winning bidder already, these must be put at risk, and augmented as necessary to equal or exceed the bid.

After this operation is completed, the next highest surviving bid is honored; and this is repeated until all players are accounted for, or two or more players remain who have no bids standing against one another. In this case, the players may each move one bid from an ineligible opponent to an eligible one, in the same order in which bids were placed, until bids have been honored to account for all the players in the game.

Imbalanced Bids and Allied Bidding:
If a player is the subject of a bid that exceeds the total bid points in their hand, they must put their bid hand “all in” and battle for their campaign life. Should they win the battle, they will receive only as many bid points as they risked, i.e., the best they can do is “double up.” Additionally, other players may add their cards to an imbalanced bid on the defender’s side as their allies; if the bidder wins the battle, the ally’s cards go to them, while if the bidder loses the battle, the ally will receive cards of equivalent or greater value to the ally’s contribution, from the losing bidder’s bid cards. Allied bids are placed in the same order that bids were placed at the beginning of the phase, and the defender may not “refuse” their ally’s “help.”

The Battle Phase:
The value of the bid has no impact on the battle it generates; the battle is conducted between two standard 12-element armies, using the regular DBA rules for board creation, deployment and winning and losing. However, the bidding player is always the attacker. The seizure of BUAs and camps, and the death of generals, have no impact on the battle’s bid value, but have the usual impact on the total of elements lost in the game.

The nations represented by the players in this campaign are assumed to be large, wealthy kingdoms and empires with several field armies, generals and warlords to defend their interests. No matter how brutally an army may be beaten in a given battle, the player will still present a full 12-element army fitting any option of their list in the subsequent campaign year.

Effects of Losing all Bid Cards:
If a player loses a battle that puts their last bid card at risk, they are assumed to become a puppet or vassal of the player that eliminated them, They receive three cards from the winning bidder’s post-battle bid hand, and continue play normally, but: They are not permitted to bid against their “masters” on the following turn nor may the patron nation attempt to bid for their client’s cards until such time as they have “rebelled” by placing a bid against the patron. The vassal’s bid need not be honored to break the client/patron relationship. If at any time the vassal nation acquires more cards than its ruler, it is automatically and instantly freed from vassal status.

Vassals and Bidding:
A vassalized state may not make an “allied bid” against their ruling state. If the ruling power has committed all its cards and still cannot equal an attacker’s bid, the vassal must add any uncommitted cards in its hand as needed to equal the attack against the ruling nation. If the ruling nation wins, the vassal receives cards from the loser’s hand in proportion to their contribution. If the ruler loses, the vassal’s cards are lost as well. If the vassal is reduced to zero cards by this event, the victor is the vassal’s new ruler, and must give him three cards to play with.

Bid Card Bonus Points and Special Circumstances:
In some campaigns, bid cards may have bonus point values indicated on them, which give them increased score when possessed by specific player nations. The player may add these bonus points to the value of their hand for determination of bid placement order, and for determining the final value of bid cards at the end of a campaign.

Some bid cards may also have “Special Circumstances” that affect any battles fought as a result of their play. Examples of special circumstances include compulsory BUAs and waterways, compulsory combat element garrisons in BUAs and Camps, or even compulsory littoral invasion.

Winning the Campaign:
A campaign may be played for a set number of years, at the end of which the player holding the highest total of bid card points is the winner. If one player ever has more than 82 points in a standard six-player campaign, they may be declared the automatic victor. Players may also accumulate a victory point for every year they have the most bid card points at the end of the Battle Phase, and award the victory to the player who “wins” the most years within the preset duration of the campaign.

APHooper
04-01-2009, 06:32 PM
DBA “Bid Campaign” Data Sheet

Campaign Title: Campaigns of the Sung Dynasty, 985 AD
Belligerent Player Nations:

III/23 Khmer Empire Tropical Ag: 2
1 x Elephant (General), 1 x Elephant, 1 x 3Cav, 4 x 4Ax, 2 x 4Bw, 2 x 2Ps, 1 x Art or 3Bd or 3Ax
Bid Cards: City of Yasodharapura (4 points), Elephant Trains (3 Points), The Mekong River (3 points), The Temple of Preah Ko (2 points), East Baray Reservoir (2 points), The Java Route (1 point) Galangal (1 Point), The Cardomom Mountains (1 point)

III/54 Early Samurai (Heian Dynasty of Japan) Hilly Ag: 1
1 x 3Cav or 4Bw (General), 3 x 3Cav, 3 x 3Bw or 3Bd, 5 x 3Ax
Bid Cards: Oryza Sativa japonica (Japanese Rice) (4 points), The City of Heian Kyo (3 Points), Island of Hokkaido (3 points), “Koto” (Old Swords) (2 points), Long-range Navigation (2 points), The Kokin Wakashu cycle (1 point) The Palace of Heian (1 Point), The Tale of Genji (1 point)

III/55 Khitan Liao Steppe Ag: 2
1 x 3Kn (General), 1 x 3Kn, 3 x 3Cav, 3 x 2LH (1 x 4Bd, 1 x 4Cb, 2 x 7Hd) or (1 x 3Kn, 1 x 3 Cav, 2 x 2LH)
Bid Cards: City of Shangjing (4 points), Manchurian Horses (3 Points), The Bo Hai Seaway (3 points), The Hanging Temple of Datong (2 points), The Sixteen Prefectures (2 points), Shanxi Millet (1 point) City of Beijing (1 Point), Shira Muren River (1 point)

III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean Hilly Ag: 1
1 x 3Cav (General), 1 x 3Cav, 1 x 2LH, 4 x Sp, 4 x 3/4Bw, 1 x 3Cav or 3Sp or Art or 2Ps
Bid Cards: Gold Mines of Unsan (4 points), The City of Kaesong (3 Points), Korean Marble (3 points), The City of Gyeongju (2 points), The Bronze Bell of Seongdeok (2 points), Ginseng (1 point) The Amrok River (1 Point), The Triptaka Koryana (1 point)

III/61 Sung Chinese Arable Ag: 1
1 x 3Cav.(General), 1 x 3Cav or Art, 1 x 3Bd or 2Ps,, 4 x 3/4Cb, 2 x 4Bd, 2 x 4Bd or 3Bw, 1 x 7Hd, 2 x 2Ps
Bid Cards: Early Ripening Rice (4 points), The City of Bianjing (3 Points), Yangtze River Trade (3 points), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 points), Tea and Salt Monopolies (2 points), Gunpowder (1 point) The Clock of Zhang Sixun (1 Point), Confucian Scholarship (1 point)

III/66 Hsi-Hsia Steppe Ag: 2
1 x 4Kn (General), 2 x 3Kn, 2 x 2LH, 3 x 4Bd, 3 x 3Bw or 2Ps, 1 x 2LH or 7Hd
Bid Cards: The City of Yinchuan (4 points), Tangut Wool (3 Points), The Black City of Khara Khoto (3 points), Dingnan County (2 points), Gansu Wheat (2 points), Himalayan Goji (1 point) The Melons of Kumal (1 Point), The School of Wutaishan (1 point)

APHooper
04-01-2009, 06:34 PM
Campaign Record, Trial #1:
Played February 6th, 2009, at The Game Matrix, Tacoma, Washington

Players/Army Lists:
Herbie Fairbanks: III/23 Khmer or Cham
Gary Greiss: III/54 Early Samurai
Gene Anderson: III/55 Khitan-Liao
Dale Mickel and Scott Murphy: III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korea
Craig Steed: III/66 Hsi-Hsia
Bryan Shein & Steve Gahn: III/61 Sung Chinese

Campaigns of the Sung Dynasty, Year One (985 AD):

Turn One Bid Phase/Battle Phase Pairs:

III/66 Hsi-Hsia bids 7: The City of Yinchuan (4 Points), Tangut Wool (3 Pts)
III/61 Sung Chinese matches bid 7: Yangtze River Trade (3 pts), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 pts), Tea & Salt Monopolies (2 pt.)
III/66 His-Hsia wins the battle, 5-2

III/23 Khmer & Cham bids 5: The Mekong River (3 pts), East Baray Reservoir (1 pt.)
III/54 Early Samurai matches bid 5: The City of Heian Kyo (3 Points), The Palace of Heian (1 Point), The Tale of Genji (1 point)
III/23 Khmer & Cham wins the battle, 3G-2

III/55 Khitan Liao bids 3: The 16 Prefectures (2 pts), Shanxi Millet (1 Pt)
III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean matches bid 3: Ginseng (1 point) The Amrok River (1 Point), The Triptaka Koryana (1 point)
III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean wins the battle, 4-2

APHooper
04-01-2009, 06:35 PM
Campaigns of the Sung Dynasty, Year Two (986 AD):
Standings & Bid Hands:

First Place: III/66 Hsi-Hsia: 24 points
Bid Cards: The City of Yinchuan (4 points), Tangut Wool (3 Points), The Black City of Khara Khoto (3 points), Yangtze River Trade (3 pts), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 pts), Dingnan County (2 points), Gansu Wheat (2 points), Tea & Salt Monopolies (2 pts.), Himalayan Goji (1 point) The Melons of Kumal (1 Point), The School of Wutaishan (1 point)

Second Place: III/23 Khmer & Cham: 22 points
Bid Cards: The City of Heian Kyo (3 Points), City of Yasodharapura (4 points),Elephant Trains (3 Points), The Mekong River (3 points), The Temple of Preah Ko (2 points), East Baray Reservoir (2 points), The Java Route (1 point) Galangal (1 Point), The Cardomom Mountains (1 point), The Palace of Heian (1 Point), The Tale of Genji (1 point)

Third Place: III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean: 20 points
Bid Cards: Gold Mines of Unsan (4 points), The City of Kaesong (3 Points), Korean Marble (3 points), The 16 Prefectures (2 pts),)The City of Gyeongju (2 points), The Bronze Bell of Seongdeok (2 points), Ginseng (1 point) The Amrok River (1 Point), Shanxi Millet (1 Pt), The Triptaka Koryana (1 point)

Fourth Place: III/55 Khitan Liao: 14 points
Bid Cards: The City of Shangjing (4 points), Manchurian Horses (3 Points), The Bo Hai Seaway (3 points), The Hanging Temple of Datong (2 points), The City of Beijing (1 Point), Shira Muren River (1 point)

Fifth Place III/54 Early Samurai: 12 points
Bid Cards: Oryza Sativa japonica (Japanese Rice) (4 points), Island of Hokkaido (3 points), “Koto” (Old Swords) (2 points), Long-range Navigation (2 points), The Kokin Wakashu cycle (1 point)

Sixth Place: III/61 Sung Chinese: 10 Points
Bid Cards: Early Ripening Rice (4 points), The City of Bianjing (3 Points), Gunpowder (1 point) The Clock of Zhang Sixun (1 Point), Confucian Scholarship (1 point)

Turn Two Bid Phase/Battle Phase:

III/61 Sung Chinese: Bids 9: Early Ripening Rice (4 points), The City of Bianjing (3 Points), Gunpowder (1 point), Confucian Scholarship (1 point)
III/23 Khmer & Cham matched Bid 9: The City of Heian Kyo (3 Points), Elephant Trains (3 Points), The Mekong River (3 points),
III/61 Sung Chinese win the battle, 4-3G

III/66 Hsi-Hsia Bids 8 points: The Black City of Khara Khoto (3 points), Yangtze River Trade (3 pts), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 pts),
III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean matches Bid 8 points: The 16 Prefectures (2 pts),)The City of Gyeongju (2 points), The Bronze Bell of Seongdeok (2 points), Shanxi Millet (1 Pt), The Triptaka Koryana (1 point)
III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean wins the battle, 5G-4

III/55 Khitan Liao bids 3: The Bo Hai Seaway (3 points),
III/54 Early Samurai matches Bid 3: Long-range Navigation (2 points), The Kokin Wakashu cycle (1 point)
III/54 Early Samurai wins the battle, 4-3

APHooper
04-01-2009, 06:36 PM
Campaigns of the Sung Dynasty, Year Three (987 AD):
Standings & Bid Hands:

First Place: III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean: 28 points
Bid Cards: Gold Mines of Unsan (4 points), The Black City of Khara Khoto (3 points), The City of Kaesong (3 Points), Korean Marble (3 points), Yangtze River Trade (3 pts), The 16 Prefectures (2 pts), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 pts), The City of Gyeongju (2 points), The Bronze Bell of Seongdeok (2 points), Ginseng (1 point) The Amrok River (1 Point), Shanxi Millet (1 Pt), The Triptaka Koryana (1 point)

Second Place: III/61 Sung Chinese: 19 Points
Bid Cards: Early Ripening Rice (4 points), The City of Bianjing (3 Points), The City of Heian Kyo (3 Points), Elephant Trains (3 Points), The Mekong River (3 points), Gunpowder (1 point) The Clock of Zhang Sixun (1 Point), Confucian Scholarship (1 point)

Third Place: III/66 Hsi-Hsia: 16 points
Bid Cards: The City of Yinchuan (4 points), Tangut Wool (3 Points), Dingnan County (2 points), Gansu Wheat (2 points), Tea & Salt Monopolies (2 pts.), Himalayan Goji (1 point) The Melons of Kumal (1 Point), The School of Wutaishan (1 point)

Fourth Place III/54 Early Samurai: 15 points
Bid Cards: Oryza Sativa japonica (Japanese Rice) (4 points), The Bo Hai Seaway (3 points), Island of Hokkaido (3 points), “Koto” (Old Swords) (2 points), Long-range Navigation (2 points), The Kokin Wakashu cycle (1 point)

Fifth Place: III/23 Khmer & Cham: 13 points
Bid Cards: City of Yasodharapura (4 points), The Temple of Preah Ko (2 points), East Baray Reservoir (2 points), The Java Route (1 point) Galangal (1 Point), The Cardomom Mountains (1 point), The Palace of Heian (1 Point), The Tale of Genji (1 point)

Sixth Place: III/55 Khitan Liao: 11 points
Bid Cards: The City of Shangjing (4 points), Manchurian Horses (3 Points),The Hanging Temple of Datong (2 points), The City of Beijing (1 Point), Shira Muren River (1 point)

Turn Three Bid Phase/Battle Phase:

III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean: Bids 12 points: The Black City of Khara Khoto (3 points), Yangtze River Trade (3 pts), The 16 Prefectures (2 pts), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 pts), Ginseng (1 point) Shanxi Millet (1 point)
III/54 Early Samurai matched Bid 12: Oryza Sativa japonica (Japanese Rice) (4 points), The Bo Hai Seaway (3 points), “Koto” (Old Swords) (2 points), Long-range Navigation (2 points), The Kokin Wakashu cycle (1 point)
III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean wins the battle, 4-3G

III/61 Sung Chinese: Bids 11 points: The City of Bianjing (3 Points), Elephant Trains (3 Points), The Mekong River (3 points), Gunpowder (1 point), Confucian Scholarship (1 point)
III/56 Khmer & Cham matches Bid 11 points: City of Yasodharapura (4 points), East Baray Reservoir (2 points), The Java Route (1 point) Galangal (1 Point), The Cardomom Mountains (1 point), The Palace of Heian (1 Point), The Tale of Genji (1 point)
III/61 Sung Chinese wins the battle, 3G-0

III/66 Hsi-Hsia Bids 11 points: The City of Yinchuan (4 points), Tangut Wool (3 Points), Gansu Wheat (2 points), Tea & Salt Monopolies (2 pts.)
III/55 Khitan Liao matches Bid 11: The City of Shangjing (4 points), Manchurian Horses (3 Points),The Hanging Temple of Datong (2 points), The City of Beijing (1 Point), Shira Muren River (1 point)
III/66 Hsi-Hsia wins the battle, 4-0 III/55 Khitan Liao becomes the vassal of III/66 Hsi-Hsia. The Hsi-Hsia must give three bid cards to his vassal: he chooses Dingnan County (2 points), Himalayan Goji (1 point) and the Shira Muren River (1 point)

APHooper
04-01-2009, 06:37 PM
Campaigns of the Sung Dynasty, Year Four (988 AD):
Standings & Bid Hands:

First Place: III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean: 40 points
Bid Cards: Gold Mines of Unsan (4 points), Oryza Sativa japonica (Japanese Rice) (4 points), The Bo Hai Seaway (3 points), The Black City of Khara Khoto (3 points), The City of Kaesong (3 Points), Korean Marble (3 points), Yangtze River Trade (3 pts), The 16 Prefectures (2 pts), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 pts), The City of Gyeongju (2 points), The Bronze Bell of Seongdeok (2 points), “Koto” (Old Swords) (2 points), Long-range Navigation (2 points), The Amrok River (1 Point), Ginseng (1 point), The Kokin Wakashu cycle (1 point), Shanxi Millet (1 Point), The Triptaka Koryana (1 point)

Second Place: III/61 Sung Chinese: 30 Points
Bid Cards: City of Yasodharapura (4 points), Early Ripening Rice (4 points), The City of Bianjing (3 Points), The City of Heian Kyo (3 Points), Elephant Trains (3 Points), The Mekong River (3 points), East Baray Reservoir (2 points), The Cardomom Mountains (1 point), The Clock of Zhang Sixun (1 Point), Confucian Scholarship (1 point), Galangal (1 Point), Gunpowder (1 point), The Java Route (1 point) The Palace of Heian (1 Point), The Tale of Genji (1 point)

Third Place: III/66 Hsi-Hsia: 23 points
Bid Cards: The City of Shangjing (4 points), The City of Yinchuan (4 points), Manchurian Horses (3 Points), Tangut Wool (3 Points), The Hanging Temple of Datong (2 points), Gansu Wheat (2 points), Tea & Salt Monopolies (2 pts.), The City of Beijing (1 Point), The Melons of Kumal (1 Point), The School of Wutaishan (1 point)

Fourth Place: III/55 Khitan Liao: 4 points (Vassal of Hsi-Hsia)
Bid Cards: Dingnan County (2 points), Himalayan Goji (1 point) and the Shira Muren River (1 point)

Fifth Place III/54 Early Samurai: 3 points
Bid Cards:Island of Hokkaido (3 points)

Sixth Place: III/23 Khmer & Cham: 2 points
Bid Cards: The Temple of Preah Ko (2 points)

Turn Four Bid Phase/Battle Phase:

III/61 Sung Chinese: Bids 30 points: City of Yasodharapura (4 points), Early Ripening Rice (4 points), The City of Bianjing (3 Points), The City of Heian Kyo (3 Points), Elephant Trains (3 Points), The Mekong River (3 points), East Baray Reservoir (2 points), The Cardomom Mountains (1 point), The Clock of Zhang Sixun (1 Point), Confucian Scholarship (1 point), Galangal (1 Point), Gunpowder (1 point), The Java Route (1 point) The Palace of Heian (1 Point), The Tale of Genji (1 point)
III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean matches Bid 30: Oryza Sativa japonica (Japanese Rice) (4 points), The Bo Hai Seaway (3 points), The Black City of Khara Khoto (3 points), The City of Kaesong (3 Points), Korean Marble (3 points), Yangtze River Trade (3 pts), The 16 Prefectures (2 pts), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 pts), The City of Gyeongju (2 points), The Bronze Bell of Seongdeok (2 points), “Koto” (Old Swords) (2 points),The Triptaka Koryana (1 point)
III/61 Sung Chinese wins the battle, 3G-2

III/66 Hsi-Hsia Bids 4 points: Tangut Wool (3 Points), The School of Wutaishan (1 point)
III/54 Early Samurai meets, but does not match the Hsi-Hsia Bid at 3: The Island of Hokkaido (3 Points) No allies are willing to join the battle, so the Hsi-Hsia may retract one point of bids, and withdraws The School of Wutaishan (1 point).
III/66 Hsi-Hsia wins the battle, 2G-0 III/54 Early Samurai becomes the vassal of III/66 Hsi-Hsia. The Hsi-Hsia must give three bid cards to his vassal: he chooses The City of Beijing (1 Point), The Melons of Kumal (1 Point), and The School of Wutaishan (1 point)

III/55 Khitan Liao Bids 2 points: Dingnan County (2 points)
III/23 Khmer & Cham matches bid 2 points: The Temple of Preah Ko (2 points)
III/23 Khmer & Cham wins the battle, 4-3

Campaigns of the Sung Dynasty, Trial One, Final Standings
Standings & Bid Hands:

First Place: III/61 Sung Chinese: 60 Points
Bid Cards: City of Yasodharapura (4 points), Early Ripening Rice (4 points), Oryza Sativa japonica (Japanese Rice) (4 points), The Bo Hai Seaway (3 points), The Black City of Khara Khoto (3 points), The City of Bianjing (3 Points), The City of Heian Kyo (3 Points), The City of Kaesong (3 Points), Elephant Trains (3 Points), Korean Marble (3 points), The Mekong River (3 points), Yangtze River Trade (3 pts), The 16 Prefectures (2 pts), 200,000 Bolts of Silk (2 pts), The Bronze Bell of Seongdeok (2 points), The City of Gyeongju (2 points), East Baray Reservoir (2 points), “Koto” (Old Swords) (2 points), The Cardomom Mountains (1 point), The Clock of Zhang Sixun (1 Point), Confucian Scholarship (1 point), Galangal (1 Point), Gunpowder (1 point), The Java Route (1 point) The Palace of Heian (1 Point), The Tale of Genji (1 point), The Triptaka Koryana (1 point)

Second Place: III/66 Hsi-Hsia: 23 points + 2 Vassal Nations
Bid Cards: The City of Shangjing (4 points), The City of Yinchuan (4 points), The Island of Hokkaido (3 points), Manchurian Horses (3 Points), Tangut Wool (3 Points), The Hanging Temple of Datong (2 points), Gansu Wheat (2 points), Tea & Salt Monopolies (2 pts.)

Third Place: III/56 Koryo Dynasty Korean: 10 points
Bid Cards: Gold Mines of Unsan (4 points), Long-range Navigation (2 points), The Amrok River (1 Point), Ginseng (1 point), The Kokin Wakashu cycle (1 point), Shanxi Millet (1 Point)

Fourth Place: III/23 Khmer & Cham: 4 points
Bid Cards: Dingnan County (2 points), The Temple of Preah Ko (2 points)

Fifth Place III/54 Early Samurai: 3 points (Vassal of Hsi-Hsia)
Bid Cards: The City of Beijing (1 Point), The Melons of Kumal (1 Point), and The School of Wutaishan (1 point)

Sixth Place: III/55 Khitan Liao: 2 points (Vassal of Hsi-Hsia)
Bid Cards: Himalayan Goji (1 point) and the Shira Muren River (1 point)

Spanikopites
04-02-2009, 11:28 AM
Andy!

You surface with a fistfull of goodness. I like. Sort of gives a 'Civ' vibe to the whole thing.

I must study and apply...

thanks!

Pavane
04-02-2009, 11:54 AM
That looks very nice, although a fair amount of research has to be done in advance to give the campaign character.

Paul A. Hannah
04-02-2009, 12:56 PM
The “Bid System” for the conduct of DBA Campaigns... No matter how brutally an army may be beaten in a given battle, the player will still present a full 12-element army...in the subsequent campaign year.I really like this feature of Andy's campaign system. Sure, I know it's realistic for the army of some beleagured despot to be numerically inferior, but, to me, it's just not DBA if it's not 12 elements a side.

Kontos
04-02-2009, 01:17 PM
Very interesting concept, Andy. I'm going to tempt my group with it. Thanks.

OK, maybe I'll stay now. Let DK leave. :D

Frank

David Kuijt
04-02-2009, 01:52 PM
OK, maybe I'll stay now. Let DK leave. :D


Now you've made me self-conscious. If nobody else is leaving, I don't want you all to call me a poopy-head when I'm gone, so I'll stay.

David Kuijt
04-02-2009, 01:54 PM
I really like this feature of Andy's campaign system. Sure, I know it's realistic for the army of some beleagured despot to be numerically inferior, but, to me, it's just not DBA if it's not 12 elements a side.

I like Andy's system also. This seems to allow a full campaign to be played out in an evening (four battles or so), which frankly the book campaign system totally fails in.

Hannibal Ad Portas
04-02-2009, 03:27 PM
This is an excellent way to run the campaigns.....I like it a lot. I want to run a campaign for my local club. Since they aren't all DBA enthusiasts, the bidding and cards allow an organizer to be creative and can include some entertainment value!!

Another idea I have been toying with involves terrain placement...I hate the fact that an army with high aggression has no say over terrain...even in their homeland!! Also, you should have some benefit for defending home turf. So....if you lose the terrain roll and are on home territory for the battle, then after the terrain is set you can add, remove or replace any terrain feature....the only proviso being that the number of terrain pieces and their sizes must still meet the limits required by the DBA rules.

So, for example, let's say you are Tuaregs.....and you are fighting on home ground against a low aggression invader (or you are attacking someone to regain your lost land, for that matter). They win the terrain roll and put out not a single dune....so your camels are demoralized by this event. After the terrain is set....you could add a dune as one of the 2-3 optional pieces of terrain. This might require you to remove a terrain piece to keep the number 3 or less....but no big deal.

What do you think??

Oh...and since Andy's campaign really doesn't involve seizing territories as in the book....how about having this rule apply to the city cards. Each player's card deck could include 3 cities (each city card marked to show its original owner)....when you wager one of your cities in a battle...and you are the defender...you get the terrain option I mention above. If you invade someone and you wager one of the defender's captured city cards...then they also can get the terrain option.

John Meunier
04-02-2009, 05:21 PM
This is an interesting looking system. Am I reading correctly? Do you have allies only on a "defending" side?

David Kuijt
04-02-2009, 05:35 PM
This is an interesting looking system. Am I reading correctly? Do you have allies only on a "defending" side?

There are no allies in the sense of an allied contingent. There may be allies in the sense of "taking the bet" for leftover (value-unmatched) wagered stuff. That's if I understand it correctly.

APHooper
04-06-2009, 02:48 PM
David has this right -- in version 1.0, there is no provision for allied contingents on the battlefield, but if a player overwhelms another by bidding far more points than he can match, the "biddee" may ask if others "want in" on the bid. They can put their uncommitted cards at risk alongside his, but it is the "biddee" and his army that must win the battle for any allies to both save their cards and receive some from a defeated bidder.

I have every intention of working on these rules further, and one piece of chrome that appeals to me is allowing a "Biddee" to swap some number of elements from his original muster for alternatives that correspond to troops in an ally's muster -- possibly a number of elements equal to the ally's Aggression rating. So using that example, a Khitan-Liao army under overwhelming attack by the Sung Chinese, and "aided" by cards contributed by the Hsi-Hsia (Ag. 2), might swap out its 7Hd stands for a pair of 3Kn elements! This would constitute a substantial benefit from the assistance of an otherwise merely opportunistic ally, but still result in a 12-on-12 DBA game.

Another point that isn't mentioned above is that in the Sung China test campaign, we agreed that the "biddee" was the Defender in all our games. So there was no rolling for attacker/defender, and the player forced to fight by an aggressive bid always had the consolation of creating the game board. This is not discussed in the Bid rules, but it seemed to have the approval of all 8 participants.

More to come,
Andy Hooper
Bacteria Valley

APHooper
04-06-2009, 02:59 PM
Now you've made me self-conscious. If nobody else is leaving, I don't want you all to call me a poopy-head when I'm gone, so I'll stay.

I guess that one doesn't tally over 7,000 posts without mixing a few poopy-heads here and there. I can't tell you how relieved I am to have access to your commentary again, David, without you my life was a dark and roaring void of ignorance.

Andy Hooper
Vale of the Microbe

Kontos
04-06-2009, 03:27 PM
I guess that one doesn't tally over 7,000 posts without mixing a few poopy-heads here and there. I can't tell you how relieved I am to have access to your commentary again, David, without you my life was a dark and roaring void of ignorance.

Andy Hooper
Vale of the Microbe

Have no fear, Andy. Nothing's changed. Our posts do not disturb the gods of ignorance nor do they shed light on our darkest hours. :D

Frank

David Kuijt
04-06-2009, 03:50 PM
I guess that one doesn't tally over 7,000 posts without mixing a few poopy-heads here and there.

True. Except that my posts are always the soul of empathy and solicitude. (pay no attention to any who aver otherwise).

I can't tell you how relieved I am to have access to your commentary again, David, without you my life was a dark and roaring void of ignorance.


Like George W. Bush, I feel your pain. It was to assist people like you that I started my email list of "my greatest blows against the dark and roaring void of ignorance." Comes out weekly; available for a small fee, renewable annually. Makes great stocking stuffers for the ignorant, misguided, and those who disagree with me!

Pthomas
04-06-2009, 04:08 PM
Comes out weekly; available for a small fee, renewable annually. Makes great stocking stuffers for the ignorant, misguided, and those who disagree with me!

Your circulation must be enormous!

Kontos
04-06-2009, 04:21 PM
Your circulation must be enormous!


:rotfl :rotfl :rotfl

David Kuijt
04-06-2009, 04:39 PM
Your circulation must be enormous!

Good one, Pthom!