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konstantinius
02-16-2005, 10:47 PM
I've taken a map of the era I'm interested in and assigned an abstract monetary value 1-10 on the cities involved, measured in Gold Points--GP. Only Constantinople and Baghdad are 10 with most of the non-capital cities not exceeding 3 (3 would be a rather high value for a non-capital). Cordoba (Cap.) is a 6, along with Damascus. Paris, London, Burgos, Aachen, Rome (all capitals of their respective nations) are a 4. Salonica is a 2, most smaller cities a 1.
This is in an effort to keep the tracking as simple as possible. Resourse Management allows room for an almost endless twisting and bending, adding, expanding etc. Feel free to construct your own, remember that you'll need many scribes to follow you around with updated notes!
My initial attempt was modeled after Jason Ehlers' "Civilized DBA Campaigns" as published on the Variant link of the Resourse Page. Soon I was unable (or unwilling) to apply this on a map with something like 40 towns but it'll work just fine for a smaller, 6-8 player campaign.
Don't forget to assign a cost for the replacement of elements. This value should differ, i.e El, Kn, Bd, and Wwg cost 4 GP each, while at the bottom Hd cost 1/2 GP.
During recruiting add your income and replace the appropriate elements. Many variations exist as to what to do with the left over income; a quick solution is that it could be converted to PP.
I personally use it to hire extra elements, at a determined price for each, as mercenaries so that a 13-or-14-element army is possible. As part of the Special Rules, certain nations are allowed this extra recruitment of up to two elements, 14 max (Seljuks, Berbers, Pechenegs) as a means of representing their usual numeric superiority. All other armies are allowed only one extra element, 13 maximum (here I should note that I play on a 3x2 table). Armies hire those extra elements from either their existing army lists or based on some historical reality. Pecheneg LH, i.e., could get hired by Byzantines, Early Hungarians, Early Serbs, Seljuks etc.
I've maintained one unaltered paragraph from Ehlers' work: that of a City Wall under "Other Civic Improvements, p.2, as a means of disposing with additional leftover income. If you stil have "moneys" left, you could choose to up one of your cities' fortifications (again, set a price for that) which will give a -1 to the attacker's roll during sieges, or built an additional Naval Factor if not up to max allowed (see Naval Campaign Rules).
Set the price of both hired contingents and fortifications at a reasonably high level so it's not attainable early and immediately in the campaign. I.e. the element of Flemish Pk that the Anglo Norman has hired a couple of times (not time for Pk yet, it should be Sp from the Feudal French list, but I'm being inaccurate on purpose) comes at a steep 5 GP.
The price of any NF should be a little lower, especially in nations with maritime tradition (Pisa, Venice).
So, that's it for PP. Have a look at the extended and detailed variant by Jason Ehlers www.erols.com/brant/DBA/campcivilized.html (http://www.erols.com/brant/DBA/campcivilized.html)

konstantinius
02-16-2005, 10:56 PM
The link below doesn't work. It's probably part of the old page. The only thing that I found for Ehlers is under "Resources for Campaign Games", www.fanaticus.org/DBA/Variants/index.html, (http://www.fanaticus.org/DBA/Variants/index.html,) but that's not the one I'm looking at right now. Maybe Chris could help to locate "Civilized DBA Campaigns"?

imported_JamesLDIII
02-17-2005, 12:07 AM
I think it is important to distinguish between two different types of campaigns that seem to occur with DBA.

1) A campaign designed to begin and end in one day, or perhaps a weekend.

2) A campaign conducted as a serial over a period of weeks and months.

In the first instance, a premium is placed on quickly moving through the campaign movement/admin phases and focusing the vast majority of time on fighting the DBA battles that result.

In the second instance, there is time for more serious diplomacy, thinking about turns, resource rules, etc.

I see the original DBA campaign rules as designed primarily for the first instance. They get one quickly to the point of conducting battles in a context without any "fluff." OTOH, the Roman and Hellenistic campaigns hosted by Mike Demana in Columbus OH is more of the second type. Both are excellent at what they do. But they are intended differently and so designed differently.

Timurilank
02-18-2005, 08:14 PM
JD wrote :
1) A campaign designed to begin and end in one day, or perhaps a weekend.

2) A campaign conducted as a serial over a period of weeks and months.

In the first instance, a premium is placed on quickly moving through the campaign movement/admin phases and focusing the vast majority of time on fighting the DBA battles that result.

In the second instance, there is time for more serious diplomacy, thinking about turns, resource rules, etc. You have a point but then if wish to have a short campaign completed in one day then I would chose a field campaign between two major powers dividing the cyclic map in two parts. I would need only two players for the strategic game and at least six for the battles. No doubt within a year of game play I would have armies battling at least two seasons. Opens up the possibility of a BBDBA as the armies merge.

As for the second and more involved campaign, the basic DBA system still seems to offer some players a good basis of operation.

cheers,

Timurilank
02-18-2005, 09:58 PM
konstantinius wrote: I've taken a map of the era I'm interested in and assigned an abstract monetary value 1-10 on the cities involved, measured in Gold Points--GP. Only Constantinople and Baghdad are 10 with most of the non-capital cities not exceeding 3 (3 would be a rather high value for a non-capital). Cordoba (Cap.) is a 6, along with Damascus. Paris, London, Burgos, Aachen, Rome (all capitals of their respective nations) are a 4. Salonica is a 2, most smaller cities a 1. I like the idea of a value reflecting the importance of each city location within a country. These could also serve to define the terrain associated with that area, with Arable locations generating the highest value to Dry at the low end of the scale. This could help games masters preparing terrain options ahead of time to help speed the setting up of the battlefield.

Secondly, I might think about using that “total value” as a factor determining the kind of war conducted; from a simple raid, punitive expedition or an invasion. One could consider the Arab tribes bordering the Sassanid and Byzantine empires as no more capable as raiding or assisting the field armies of either major power. As a non-player kingdom, consisting of three provinces, each province is capable of operating independent of one another. Later, as the political climate in “Arabia” changes they can be finally unified to field their own army capable of conquest.

This has certainly given me lot to work with and I appreciate the ideas.

thanks,