PDA

View Full Version : The fastest brush in the West!


Africanus
01-04-2003, 09:41 AM
I'm wondering how long it takes most people to complete an army? From undercoat to final dip,it takes me at least a month, scraping in an hour here and there when the kids will allow it.
I remember reading a post from David K saying how many painted armies he has, and thinking, HOLY #$&%, that's an awful lot of hours. Only something I can dream about at the moment.

[ January 04, 2003, 06:47: Message edited by: neil ]

Paul A. Hannah
01-04-2003, 11:16 AM
Take heart, Neil; you have company with other slow painters. I've never really tallied the number of hours to paint a DBA army, but I can say I have some that have been "in progress" for a VERY long time. I have 36+ DBA armies, but some of those figures I painted while in college 20 years ago.

During the long rainy season here in Seattle, I probably average 10-12 hours' painting time per week. I'm doing well if I can finish eight 15mm figures or four 1/300 planes (my other painting & gaming passion) per week. I'm a good painter, but that's still probably very low productivity.

No matter: I enjoy my painting time, and, of course, what's the point of a hobby if it isn't fun, right?

[ January 04, 2003, 08:18: Message edited by: Paul A. Hannah ]

Stelzone
01-04-2003, 12:51 PM
Neil,

Take heart I used to be a lot slower than I am now. There are ways to speed up. ( Of course my best way was to volunteer to paint up the lead for our BBDBA games. Deadlines have a way of getting my attention.) :D

First for me was accepting a level of painting that I felt was slightly below my best. I started on 25mm Fantasy and was used to doing as much detail as I could on them. And if they didn't have the detail I wanted I added it. Well for 15mm armies that is to time consuming, do the obvious detail on most and leave the best for the command stand. As you go on you will find your self redefining what needs painting and what doesn't.

Second look at how others do it and pick and choose what is best for you. I painted individual figs by hand for years( 25mm ). They had enough room on them that I could pick them up and set them down without mounting them and I had no idea there was another way. After going to 15mm I started using strips, made my own out of 1x2 stock- popcicle sticks were to light for me. Then after reading about using nails on the Resource Page, I switched to them and it cut my painting time in half or more. And it allows me to add more detail again, plus I've sped up from practice. And with the nails I stopped using washes, something I never thought came out right, and went to the miracle dip method, again speeding up the process.

Well, I hope this helps some. AND don't compare yourself to David Kuijt, he has an ability to put quality and quanity together that most can't equal. I'll never catch up with my buying habits when it come to lead but I'm satisfied. (I don't really recommend the deadline method, twice I've been painting lead the night before an 8 hour drive to Historicon.) smile.gif

Mike S.

[ January 04, 2003, 09:57: Message edited by: Stelzone ]

bobmcdonald
01-04-2003, 12:52 PM
Several years ago I discovered the best time to paint was while I was waiting for my wife to get done in the bathroom in the morning. (I did my thing first, and since we carpooled at that time, I had to do *something* ... did not take much to get me to paint.)

To get back to the topic, I decided at the same time to keep a notebook so I could figure out just how much time I was squeezing in in these little dribs and drabs, that could vary from 5 to 30 minutes. When your doing it every day, it sure adds up.

Anyway, I averaged 20 minutes per man overall, including de-flashing, priming, painting, and basing. So a Roman army at that time (IIRC, 42 figs), would be about 17 hours.

I was quite a dawdler as I remember, and have not timed myself since. In fact, I have not painted much since :(

It might be interesting to re-gear for painting (now that I finally have my house put back together after years of moving, renting, and remodeling) and try the time and motion study again. Especially now that I am considering the 6mm/2mm ranges.

Roland Fricke
01-04-2003, 01:12 PM
I once figured it took me almost an hour a figure from start to finish. I'm very picky (so I'll do certain areas over again if I'm not satisfied), and do several washes, dry brushing and blacklining. I susually use the popsicle strip method but I think I'm going to try the nail head method with my next army to see if this works faster. One problem I have with the strip method is that you can't get at the most convient angle all the time.

Deadlines help (If it weren't for the last minute nothing would ever get done) so my BBDBA partner and I have the next 2-3 cons planned and in works.

Having the time helps too. With kids and a wife and a house and a job there's not much left for painting sometimes. When I was in grad school I painted a lot more but I had the time and no money. Now I have money but no time.

Africanus
01-04-2003, 01:45 PM
What material do you all find is the best for basing? All i've ever used is double ply Balsa. Easy to cut, cheap and pretty durable.
Also, acrylics or enamels?

Paul A. Hannah
01-04-2003, 02:15 PM
I use something called "anniversary board" (dunno why), which is really just a hefty, paper-based, poster-board material. I get it at art-supply stores. It comes in sheets that are about 1M square, cuts easily and it's cheap. But is it any better than balsa or metal? Probably not.

Like others' work I've seen, I apply some plaster to the base, stain it brown, apply some paint and flocking (usually green), add bits of rock, tufts of tall grass and/or small bushes. --For an example, take a peek at the title page of our local DBA group's Yahoo page at... http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Northgate_Ancients_Gamers_DBA/

Oh, you also asked whether folks use enamels or acrylics. I, for one, use almost entirely arylics.

[ January 04, 2003, 11:24: Message edited by: Paul A. Hannah ]

Africanus
01-04-2003, 03:17 PM
That is a fine piece of painting Paul. Did you paint it? If only I was half as good....sigh

Paul A. Hannah
01-04-2003, 03:23 PM
Yes, and thank you, Neil; you've very kind. It's Chariot Miniatures' 15mm Seleucid elephant model.

David Kuijt
01-04-2003, 04:13 PM
I base my figures on a composite structure: I use hotmelt glue to glue metal bases to the flesh side of 5-7 oz leather, then cut out the leather using the metal as a guide. The resulting base is very good in all respects.

Painting easy armies (Numidians, Early Libyans) I can do an army in three to six hours, counting everything, although not consecutive hours (there are sit-and-wait steps in there). That's about 5-8 figures an hour. Painting fancy armies with lots of heraldry I sometimes take as much as half an hour or a full hour per figure.

My painting speed has improved over the four years I've been playing DBA, though.

Africanus
01-04-2003, 05:03 PM
So we're talking assembly line sort of thing? Undercoat everything, then out with a certain colour and hit every element that needs it with that specific colour?
Or paint 1 base at a time?
Just curious as I don't have much contact with other gamers. Remote, lonely old town this one!
I have been painting a base at a time. A little more messing around, but I get to see the end result a lot quicker. I just don't like looking at a half painted base. :D

David Kuijt
01-05-2003, 03:04 AM
Originally posted by neil:
So we're talking assembly line sort of thing? Undercoat everything, then out with a certain colour and hit every element that needs it with that specific colour?I work 12-16 figs at a time, often from three armies, to prevent boredom. So I'll be working on one or two stands of III/19b Welsh 3Bw, one stand of Alex Mac II/12 Prodomoi 2LH, a couple of stands of II/23c LPI Arab Yemeni 3Ax, etc. The only time I violate that is when I've got a bunch of similar figures as a batch (like 4x4Bw NKE archers), or when I'm painting an army for pay (in which case about half the figs I'm working on are for the pay army, and half for me). I work one set all the way through (de-flash, add pin spears and custom work, prime, glue to nails, paint, dip, glue to bases) before starting another. I wait until I have 6-10 bases before doing them all together (add plaster, seal and stain, drybrush, flock, matte sealer).

Africanus
01-05-2003, 04:49 AM
Is there anywhere I can view some of your work David? Do you make a lot of terrain?
I'm interested to see what sort of setup others use.I'm Also interested in scratch building. Anyone have any good links?
Thanks for all the replies by the way.

David Kuijt
01-05-2003, 05:23 AM
Originally posted by neil:
Is there anywhere I can view some of your work David? Do you make a lot of terrain?I don't make a lot of terrain -- just some for my own use.

How much of my work you want to view online depends upon how much bandwidth you have. There something like one or two thousand jpegs of my work on my 15mm figure review website at:

www.umiacs.umd.edu/~kuijt/miscellania/figreview.html (http://www.umiacs.umd.edu/~kuijt/miscellania/figreview.html)

Some of the work is older stuff; some is fairly recent. I haven't been very good about putting up pics of figures I've painted in the last year or so, so it doesn't have much of my most recent stuff.

Stelzone
01-05-2003, 12:15 PM
Originally posted by Roland Fricke:
I susually use the popsicle strip method but I think I'm going to try the nail head method with my next army to see if this works faster. One problem I have with the strip method is that you can't get at the most convient angle all the time.
Roland,

That is why I went with the nail method. Hated not being able to reach certain details or to easily continue a line around a figure. Nails allow you to finish a color on a figure and go to th next easily. On strips if I had to stop in the middle( kids, etc.), I wouldn't always remember that I had to finish them until I was into another part of the figure. ( i.e. Turn over the strip after doing the tunic backs and finding I hadn't finished the flesh on front.) Doesn't happen with nails as you can quickly finish it all.

I also have added a lot of detail as I have gone on. I would never have tried plaids and tartans with the strips they never turned out well. With nails I'm in the middle of a Gallic army that will look fairly real when I am done.

Mike

Stelzone
01-05-2003, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by neil:
What material do you all find is the best for basing? All i've ever used is double ply Balsa. Easy to cut, cheap and pretty durable.
Also, acrylics or enamels?Neil,

I use metal sheet, that way I can put the magnetic sheetong in my boxes to hold them down. I use one of the "Super Glues" to hold them. And I have never had any problem with them coming off fro just heat and cold. They do come off fairly easily if you flex the bases, makes it easier to rebase them if need be.

As to paints I use what ever I can find in the colors I want. Enamels or acrylics just give your paint time to dry and their isn't a problem. Don't mix brushes between them to often as the suffer from it.

Mike

Ares
01-06-2003, 03:59 AM
Originally posted by Stelzone:
That is why I went with the nail method.What's the best glue to use for the nail painting method?

Eric

David Kuijt
01-06-2003, 05:19 AM
Originally posted by Ares:
What's the best glue to use for the nail painting method?
I prime first, then use a gel-form super glue. They hold fine, even through dipping and shaking off excess dip (you don't want it to fall off the nail while in the dip can!) and when I want to get them off slipping an exacto blade between the nail head and the figure pops them right off. Priming first makes it easier, though -- the glue sticks to the primer better than the primer sticks to the figure, so the primer comes off on the nail. On the underside of the base this is perfectly OK.

Chris Jones
01-06-2003, 08:11 PM
As for the acrylic or enamel issue, I sort of grew up with enamels - it was sort of them or oils in those days. And for years I resited acrylics - I used to do highlighting and shading while the paint was still wet - it's not bad and then I tried acrylics. First of all they dry a lot lot quicker so forget highlighting and shading the paint will be too dry. But if you undercoat in white and then wash with a dark umber, when you apply a thin coat of a colour the dark shows through and you have wonderful shading for free. you have to be a bit more careful not to paint over areas in the wrong colour but overall the effect is so much better and quicker.
With acrylics don't forget your local art shop - they will have a range of colours that model shops don't stock and they tend to be cheaper.

Also, big plus - acrylics don't smell the house out like enamels and you mix them with water!! Safer if you have children.

Grahamthemole
01-07-2003, 05:42 PM
Mike wrote...

That is why I went with the nail method. Hated not being able to reach certain details or to easily continue a line around a figure.

Well I confess I used to use a silmilar system to hold each figure. Now I base them up after balck undercoating them. Then I paint- anything you cannot get a brush to means you can't easily see anyway and it saves painting details on the figures which are later obscured after basing. The best example of this is 3 or 4 figure cavalry elements where much of the side detail, especially of the horses is toatally invisible once based. It also might not work with another colour undercoat as the balck simply looks like shadow is anything is missed out.

Of course it won't be everyone's cup of tea. I have a freind who showed me this method whose Selukid Pikemen are double based as well- some of their shields only have half the design painted on but you have to hold them at such weird angles to see this that in normal use you simply never notice. I have not been quite this radical mind you.

Regards, Graham.

Grahamthemole
01-07-2003, 05:44 PM
Apologies for the erratic spelling in my last post....my fast painting is better than my speed typing I can assure you!

Graham

Jason Ehlers
01-07-2003, 05:58 PM
Regarding painting speed with horses

I use a method of undercoating the cavalry with a rust-colored spraypaint, then all I have to do is paint tails and manes black, and horses are done.

After the whole cavalry figure is painted sometimes I have to repaint some blotches on the horses so i mix some rust colored acrylic paint.

I don't mind all rust-colored horses in my armies (except generals get light grey ones) if you want more variance this will not work for you.

Jason

Hannibal Ad Portas
01-08-2003, 02:40 AM
Jason Ehlers wrote:
Regarding painting speed with horses I use a method of undercoating the cavalry with a rust-colored spraypaint, then all I have to do is paint tails and manes black, and horses are done.
After the whole cavalry figure is painted sometimes I have to repaint some blotches on the horses so i mix some rust colored acrylic paint.
I don't mind all rust-colored horses in my armies Heck, why not just prime some of the horses in different colors? White, black and grey primer are available.....then just paint the details as you said and you have more time to trick out the rider or apply fancier washes/dry brushing to the figure.....I will have to try this!! :cool:

Robert

Africanus
01-08-2003, 08:18 AM
Firstly, its great to see all the replies. It's been an eye opener for me.
This is what I mainly(meanining always) do.....
1) Remove all the flashing with a stanley blade.
2) Base each individual element on popsticks, using thick double-sided adhesive tape.
3) Undercoat all with Matt black using the largest brush practicable.
4) Group all of the same elements , and begin painting, usually 1 stand at a time.
5) Cut out and glue bases. (using double ply Balsa wood.
6) Stick elements to base using super glue and paint the base of elements and stand, then flock.
7) When dry, paint with a clear gloss enamel.
How does this sound? I have no one's painting here to compare with, as my only DBA opponent( the only one in town....small town.) sends most of his armies away to be painted. He has more money than he knows what to do with....GRRRRR.
I get through about an army a month, when i'm painting, and as time is scarce, i'm looking for any time savers I can find.
Thanks folks. Seems there's some heavy duty painters out there.

bobmcdonald
01-08-2003, 12:43 PM
I don't mind all rust-colored horses in my armies In my own ever-so-humble opinion, the average wargame army has a lot more colorful horses than the average herd of horses (or whatever one calls an equine group). If you live in an area with lots of horses, have a look -- the VAST majority are a nice, boring brown with black manes and tails. The occasional white, gray, palomino, or what have you should be an exception (and a handy way to show who the general is).

Paul Potter
01-08-2003, 04:39 PM
I've noticed that some brands of figures paint up faster than others. I suspect this probally has something to do with the detail and shapes of figures. Essex for example seem to paint up faster and require less work to look good than do some other brands. ? -Paul

El' Jocko
01-08-2003, 05:30 PM
Originally posted by bobmcdonald:
In my own ever-so-humble opinion, the average wargame army has a lot more colorful horses than the average herd of horses (or whatever one calls an equine group). If you live in an area with lots of horses, have a look -- the VAST majority are a nice, boring brown with black manes and tails. The occasional white, gray, palomino, or what have you should be an exception (and a handy way to show who the general is).But Bob, brown covers a lot of ground. Bay, Chestnut, Roan, Dun, and probably dozens of variations within each of those categories.

Variety is the spice of life! smile.gif

- Jack

(By the way, I do like the look of an army with all brown horses and a general on a white stallion. But that's a horse of a different color.)

[ January 08, 2003, 18:30: Message edited by: El' Jocko ]

Stelzone
01-09-2003, 09:28 PM
Originally posted by bobmcdonald:
[In my own ever-so-humble opinion, the average wargame army has a lot more colorful horses than the average herd of horses (or whatever one calls an equine group). If you live in an area with lots of horses, have a look -- the VAST majority are a nice, boring brown with black manes and tails. The occasional white, gray, palomino, or what have you should be an exception (and a handy way to show who the general is).[/QUOTE]

Bob,

If you lived around here you would see a lot of greys,all shades, with quite a few whites and blacks mixed in. We have more than a few Arab farms in the area. If you pass a Quarter horse farm you'll see more duns,bays, roans and paints than straight browns.

When we were in Virginia last summer, at Williamsburg, I noticed that most of the horses I saw had throughbreed lines and they tend to be browns and dark chestnuts, again not all of them were though.

If you want your armies to look a little more real, find out what the common colors are for that area. In Central Asia it seems that Duns and Bays were more common for centuries. Some of the books mention in passing what the prefered colors were for an area. Arabs ride Arabians and you should have an army mounted on mostly greys if you do. The Black and darkest Greys were the ones owned by the generals, white tends to mean old for Arabians, they get lighter as they age.

Check out http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/ to get a better idea.

Mike

[ January 09, 2003, 18:30: Message edited by: Stelzone ]

Jeff Caruso
01-09-2003, 10:09 PM
Originally posted by Stelzone:
__________________________________________________ _______________________
quote:
Arabs ride Arabians and you should have an army mounted on mostly greys if you do.
__________________________________________________ _______________________

Both my Arabs are chestnuts(reddish brown).I saw very few,in fact I can't recall any greys.Most were chestnut,so its not necessarily possible to genaralize based on personal observation today in a given location.

I had read that whites were generally reserved for Generals and Leaders.

I'll have to look up some of the colors for the Mongols who organized toumans with separate and uniform horse colors,IIRC.

Jeff

Stelzone
01-10-2003, 12:05 AM
Jeff,

When I worked on an Arab Farm (Horse Breeders) 25 years ago, I asked about it because his were almost all greys. He said that the truest stock is grey, and that most are born mid/dark grey and lighten with age. He said that True dark or very light color horses were not that common in, what he called, true Arabians.

He also said that interbreeding in some areas produced other color types. But my impression was that the true color of the breed was grey. And I have seen a lot of the greys around here to back him up. Check out the web sites for them as I'm going on 20+ year information, but he was talking true arabs. They are also a fairly small horse compared to european breeds.

I also remember reading somewhere that Dark horses were valued by the wealthy and famous to prove their ability to keep them. Dark horses would overheat quicker than light colored ones. I'll try and find where I got that from, but don't hold your breath, I'm still working on some flags I thought I had right.

Mike

[ January 09, 2003, 21:07: Message edited by: Stelzone ]

Roland Fricke
02-23-2003, 05:53 PM
I started mounting figures on a nail now with a hot melt glue gun as mentioned here. I have to say I really like this method over the popsicle stick method I had been using for years. It probably has sped up my painting some but the big improvement is in being able to spin the figure to reach all those tight spots - an improvement in quality.

I've done foot, horses, a chariot and even tried an elephant (need a bigger nail head - roofing nails maybe for these guys). This method is definitly worth a try for anybody. I'm "nailed" on this technique.

SunTzu
03-01-2003, 02:35 AM
Hey Roland,

I've gone completely over to the nail head method. I just went out and bought a 5lb. box of roofing nails and I had some broken 4x2' ceiling tiles laying around. After glueing the figs to the nails I stick the nails in strips of the ceiling tiles. I cut the tiles into 2'x2" strips and can mount about 24 to 30 figs per strip. I makes it easy to prime this way and I start at one end when painting and go on to the other end before going to the next color/coat on each fig. It also makes for a great way to keep your work in progress organized.

I have about 300 figures in progress right now. It makes it easy to keep up with each stage of the process and I can usually turn out about 30 to 40 in a weekend of solid painting. It also makes it easy to put them back when not painting too.

Sincerely,

Trey, aka SunTzu

Kanishka
03-07-2003, 02:17 AM
Originally posted by Jason Ehlers:
Regarding painting speed with horses

I use a method of undercoating the cavalry with a rust-colored spraypaint, then all I have to do is paint tails and manes black, and horses are done.
I've done this too - to get a little more variety with the horse colours there's a couple of things you can do quickly tho:

1/ Wash the horse's body with a black or dark brown - instant darker brown body!

2/ Drybrush with a lighter brown - instant lighter body!

3/ do the above with manes and tails too to vary their shade.

While I don't mind having monotone horsies a few different shades do help!

imported_Inari7
05-12-2003, 09:28 PM
Hi, I am a new convert to the nail method. This weekend I was painting a BBDBA army. 117 figures on nails 16 hours and about 7-8 colors on each figure, I finished Sunday night. I am dipping them here on Monday, and I will probably base them Wednesday night for a Battle on Saturday. I love the nail method and the dip method that I picked up on this web site painting goes so fast now. I think thatís only 8 min. a figure.

Wanax
05-13-2003, 10:43 AM
I've never heard of the nail method before. I typically glue 12 figures to a paint stir stick, undercoat, dry, then paint down the line.

Of course, I still use the old fashion method of black undercoat and enamel paints. However, I still painted a Viking Raider army in under 8 hours. I painted a French Ordinance in less than 12.

For real quick, I painted a 500ap Early Vietcong army (-El) with ex-chin in less than 24 hours. How you ask did I paint all those Wb(f)? Easy smile.gif
They are LBP (little brown people), so I used rustoleum primer as skin color and simply painted their skirts, hair and weapons tongue.gif

However, I guess I'm slow and old fashion compared to some of the times I hear about these days. One guy painted a Numidian army in less than 4 hours :eek:

Wanax

imported_Ivan Nastikov
05-13-2003, 06:37 PM
Wanax
The guy who painted the numidians was me.
It wasn't just painting, it was packet to battlefield - basing, texturing and varnishing, plus camp.
I wanted to paint 15mm for a comp. I am a dedicated 28mm man. The only way I could tempt myself to go for the small guys was to see how quick they could be done.
I undercoated then stuck them to a base and painted in situ. rather than with a nail, it was faster. They wereblack undercoated and then painted and ink washed.
After I finished the numidians I tried to paint an army even quicker - I went for the famous 24 figure DBA army, the Early Libyans. I actually enjoyed painting these guys and they ended up taking a shade under four hours to. I shaded and hi lighted these guys and did various animal prints on their cloaks.
Their watch tower camp took me a couple of hours too, I enjoyed doing that. I will post a pic to CHris tommorow for the camp gallery.
Any how I have two 15mm armies now, that's enough for a while I am going back to 28mm. I have GB Numidians, spanish, moorish and vendel greeks to finish off......they take me about four to five hours a figure.....
Si2
DBAOL-GAZMAN

[ May 13, 2003, 15:44: Message edited by: Ivan Nastikov ]

David Crowell
05-14-2003, 12:20 AM
Originally posted by Wanax:
However, I guess I'm slow and old fashion compared to some of the times I hear about these days. One guy painted a Numidian army in less than 4 hours :eek:

Wanax 50 horse in 3 hours tonight. My secret? They are 6mm. Those little bugger paint up very very fast indeed.

Redwilde
05-14-2003, 05:05 PM
I've been using popsicle strip equivalents (about 8-16" strips of balsa) for years quite happily. For folks who have found nails faster, I'm wondering what painting style you used to use on your popsicle sticks?

I space may figures generously so I can easily reach any spot, and go down the line using the same brush stroke on each figure, or a few strokes that can be made without having to significantly change the angle of my painting hand. So for instance, doing horse harness I might have to make 4-6 different passes down the strip to get the harness all around. This seems like it ought to be quicker than pausing to spin each figure and changing your hand angle so many times. Did any folks who have found nails quicker used to use a similar technique as I do on the strips?

Darren Buxbaum
05-14-2003, 09:39 PM
Hello,
I can see the advantages of using the nail method, especially if you use the "miracle dip". I have to agree with Redwilde though, I prefer to use 12" balsa strips with about 6 horse or 8 foot figures (15mm) per strip. I glue them on at helpful angles to ease my brush into more difficult places on the figure. Lately I have been grouping figures together by similar pose. This way you can paint those belts and tack in fewer passes. I am not a very fast painter (tend to paint each figure twice), but I can bang out a few figures for a deadline. I think the fastest I have done horses is about 28 in 4 hours. This is with multiple colors, but no heraldry. Also if I have been painting similar figures for a steady amount of time, then I find a rhythum and paint faster (just putting yourself in the mood for it is difficult).

Cheers,
Darren

GAZMAN
05-15-2003, 08:52 AM
In 15mm I like to stick the guys on the bases and then paint them. I work on the fact that if you can't paint certain bits, you are unlikely to see those bits when the troops are 3 feet away on a table.
I paint a lot of Psiloi and Light horse, so the gaps are generaly big enough to get in around the whole figures. With blades and other 4 figure bases it is more difficult, but the closeness of the troops will hide the side detail anyhow.
But then again I paint 15mm only to game with. I paint 28mm for pleasure and also to game with. These I mount on pre cut bases lightly with CA adhesive. Paint them, varnish, then snap them off and base up.
Si2

Roland Fricke
05-16-2003, 11:11 PM
I had painted on wood strips for the last 20 years. Anything from 6" popcicle sticks to 12" strips of wood. About 1 horse every 2" or a foot figure every 1.5". I positioned them at odd angles to get a better brush angle too. No matter what you do you will block some sections.

I tried the nail method on a half dozen figures and was hooked. It made spinnning the figure to get to the other side easy - just twirl it in your fingers - much faster than flipping the the stick. And you hit every side perfectly. The quality of my painting has increased over the years so I'm slower as I add more steps (drybrush, shade, wash, liner etc) but I think the nails make it faster and slightly higher in quality sinc eI get a perfect angle every time.

If you've been doing the strip method for a while give it a shot - you've got nothing to lose. Got to use the hot melt glue gun though or else trying to glue figs on those little nail heads drives you nuts. Plus this way your ready to prime in minutes.

[ May 16, 2003, 20:18: Message edited by: Roland Fricke ]

imported_JLogan
05-17-2003, 12:59 AM
Amen to that Neil! I thought exactly the same thing when I saw David K.'s comment, and was green with envy, especially when you see how well he has painted some of his armies on his web-site!

I'm painting (or trying to) a 15mm Sassinid army at the moment, and frankly, I'm embarrased to say how much time I've already spent on it, with little to show for it! I'd settle for your month to have a complete army, anytime. I view painting as a neccesary evil to enjoying DBA (though I enjoy buying/choosing the figures,etc.), and can only marvel at those people who comment on this forum that they enjoy the painting up of their armies as much if not more so than the playing of them. I wish they'd "enjoy" painting up my armies for me!

derek
05-17-2003, 06:54 AM
Hullo
I started "wargaming" at around age 6 with 1/72 plastics. It was only in High School (age 14-18) that I started to paint. Humbrol enamels were fine for AFV's. They didn't work too well with figures! Fortunately my main interest was ACW so the painting was not too difficult. I left the hobby when I finished High School. I enjoyed my 4 years as a full-time University student and was far too busy studying to even think about toy soldiers. Thereafter I was a very reluctant conscript and sad to write, it put me off my hobby
for more than 15 years. I continued to collect plastic ACW (fortunately) but didn't actually do anything with them!
Eventually my eldest son turned six and I hauled out the old ACW. Younger son (then 3) promptly demolished an Airfix artillery piece :(
I went web-surfing to see if I could find another one. Shock and Horror followed :(
The same Airfix set that I had bought for 50c South African was now selling second-hand for 8.50 UKPounds
We have had a radical reduction in the value of our currency :(
I packed the ACW away on the grounds that the Airfix component had now become a "collector's item" and bought some "el-cheapo" made in China 1/32 figures for my sons.
These are a real rip-off of the original manufacturers' such as Airfix. You can buy a bag full for R10 which is slightly less than 1 US$
My interest in the hobby was revitalized by my sons' interest and the well known pc wargames Panzer General II (which uses scans of model AFV's)and Steel Panthers as well as various others. The big drawback with pc wargames then manifested itself - the pc opponent becomes predictable.
So I rejoined the local club, only to find that all they played was DBM Book II in 15mm. So I bought an Essex RMA from Spirit Games. When it arrived I was so daunted by the prospect of painting it that I promptly sent it back to the UK for a pro to paint! Over time, given the long term slide in our currency I was forced to look at cheaper commercial painters. However when the first batch arrived from a "bottom feeder" in the UK pro-market I was less than happy with the result :(
So I decided to "touch them up". This worked well as a training and confidence building exercise as I did not need to paint the whole figure. I merely added the extras which had been ignored, for example: moustaches, sandles and so on, and touched up where the painting had been sloppy. In this way I taught myself to paint figures again. Within a few months I reached the point where I could do 15mm figures from start to finish with a reasonable "wargames standard" finish. I was getting to around 50 figures a month when I suffered a severe drug reaction (I am now more than 5 years into treatment for major depression) and lost so much weight after a "bad drug" reaction that I can no longer paint 15mm as I shake too much :(
So I have had to go back to where I started, using pro's and paying in installments :(
I do however find painting very therapeutic for depression smile.gif
So I paint terrain, 1/72 AFV's and have started a small collection of 25mm mostly bought second hand. I find that I can manage to paint 25-8mm figures to a reasonable wargames standard. For someone starting out, if you are totally intimidated by the prospect of painting your first DBA army I would seriously consider using a pro-painter for your first DBA army if you can afford to. I do not buy DBA armies on e-bay (even though there are some really fine ones coming up now).
I prefer to do my own figure selection and then send it off to a pro in the UK. It takes a while to get to me, (usually about 3 months) because
most of the good UK pros have 3 month plus waiting lists, but it does allow you to enter the hobby.
Consequently I would sum up: I enjoy painting
(but recognise my own limitations) and use pro- painters as and when I can afford to. Fortunately one tends to get faster with practice.
One final point I would make is that painting has moved from the least liked aspect of the hobby for me, to an important part of the hobby smile.gif
Kind Regards
Derek

[ May 17, 2003, 09:22: Message edited by: derek ]

jason e
06-09-2003, 02:15 AM
Tonight I tried the "nail" method instead of the "strip" method for the first time, and I announce that from now on it's nails for me.

Painting has become much easier for me! Before this, painting was going so slow.

...using large (16 penny) drivers with the smooth finish and the waffle head... also made a stand with 48 holes in it to hold the nail-glued figs while they're being painted.

Try it, brothas! It's Salvation for your paintin!

imported_Delirium's Brother
06-09-2003, 08:19 PM
previously Stelzone said: I don't really recommend the deadline method, twice I've been painting lead the night before an 8 hour drive to Historicon.At least you weren't painting in the car :D .